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Benefits of Summer Reading

BENEFITS OF SUMMER READING

Library summer reading programs encourage children and teens to practice reading and literacy skills during out-of-school time, which can help maintain proficiency and counter the “summer slide” (the documented decrease in reading proficiency of students who do not read during the summer).  SRP also offers enriching activities for the entire family and community.  When you promote SRP in your community, lead with the message that SRP supports student learning and family engagement. These links to research and best practices will help you make the case.

    • The vision of the National Summer Learning Association is for every child to be safe, healthy, and engaged in learning during the summer. The NSLA connects summer learning program providers and stakeholders with tools, resources, and expertise to improve program quality, generate support, and increase youth access and participation.

 

 

 

    • The Value of Summer Reading, a research compilation from the California Library Association covering the importance of summer reading programs and the value of reading, resources relating to summer learning loss, and information on generating results that will demonstrate the impact of your summer reading program.

 

    • Library Summer Reading Programs, ALA Library Fact Sheet 17, offers some basic points on the benefits of SRP, and a selection of citations to research and best practices.

 

    • Summer Reading from Reading Rockets provides information about summer reading and summer learning loss, including tips for parents as well as resources for teachers and librarians.

 

 

    • How to Create a Knockout Summer Literacy Program by Karen Springen (School Library Journal, March 17, 2014) discusses planning, outreach, collaboration, and appropriate, literacy-related incentives. According to the article, “Many librarians are combining … inventive activities with statistic- and research-based initiatives that track summer reading outcomes. They’re aiming to redress a serious problem: the achievement gap that especially hurts lower-income kids, who typically lose two months of reading proficiency per summer, according to research.”

 

 

  • Summer Reading and the Rich/Poor Achievement Gap: An Educator Responds to Questions, a June, 2013 School Library Journal interview with Richard L. Allington, co-author of Summer Reading: Closing the Rich/Poor Achievement Gap. Allington argues that the main cause of the rich/poor reading achievement gap is unequal access to books. He urges librarians to get books into the hands of children from low-income families, especially during the summer.